Fumbling Towards Ecstacy- How did you know, Sarah Mclachlan?

thinking about my last post- specifically the last point- about expressing emotion. Its link to our orgasmic potential and inner healing. Women’s difficulty in doing so. Here is a little encouragement…

This song by Sarah Mclachlan says it all. She expressed with words and song my hearts desire before I had yet realised it. This song came to me in 2004. My Step Father had died recently and then my beloved Mother, Jane. Within a few months I divorced, fell in love, changed jobs (i started working fulltime with road Emergency Medical Services), moved home and had my heart broken by that love. My son was 2 years old. Looking back it makes sense that one night I found myself alone in my new (unwanted) house (not yet a home) on my knees crying. I must have played this song about twenty times over and over again. It pierced through my layers and held me as I grieved for everyone and everything, including myself.

Play it, use it with intention, comfort yourself- let go.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nI1p0PXq6TM&feature=related

here are the lyrics:

All the fear that has left me now
I’m not frightened anymore
It’s my heart that pounds beneath my flesh
it’s my mouth that pushes out this breath

and if I shed a tear I won’t cage it
I won’t fear love
and if I feel a rage I won’t deny it
I won’t fear love

Companion to our demons
they will dance and we will play
With chairs candles and cloths
making darkness into day
It will be easy to look in or out
upstream on down without a thought

and if I shed a tear I won’t cage it
I won’t fear love
and if I feel a rage I won’t deny it
I won’t fear love

Peace in the struggle to find peace
comfort on the way to comfort

and if I shed a tear I won’t cage it
I won’t fear love
and if I feel a rage I won’t deny it
I won’t fear love
I won’t fear love

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Graeme
    May 25, 2010 @ 16:40:29

    In similair vein. Dylan Thomas was a tortured soul and his anger and frailties eventually got the better of him at a young age but he was a man of a great spectrum of emotions, one of which is represented by his poem below.
    Listen to it at:
    http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15377

    “Do not go gentle into that good night,
    Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
    Because their words had forked no lightning they
    Do not go gentle into that good night.

    Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
    Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
    And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
    Do not go gentle into that good night.

    Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
    Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

    And you, my father, there on the sad height,
    Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
    Do not go gentle into that good night.
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.”

    Reply

  2. cathwrynn
    May 26, 2010 @ 11:16:25

    Hello Graeme, thankyou for posting- this is one of my favourites. It made a strong impression on me in my teenage years, and the sense of longing for life in the cadence of the words always moves me deeply.

    Reply

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